上海千花mm自荐

first_imgOVER the years, the Stephen and Paul Francis-coached MVP Track Club and the University of Technology (UTech) have dominated action at the Milo Western Relays.However, at last Saturdays staging of the event, both teams had to play second fiddle to the Maurice Wilson-coached G.C. Foster College and Sprintec teams, which both accounted for the majority of wins in individual and relay events.”I was very pleased with the performances of both the college and club teams, and I think we are on target, especially among the college athletes, to do very well for the remainder of the season, although it is still early days. But we do have a very vibrant team that has been very supportive in the form of Dr Joyce Royal, Paul Beckford, Marvin Gayle, Alf Remekie, and other members who have been helping so far,” said Wilson, who is also a senior lecturer at G.C. Foster College and technical leader of Jamaica’s track and field team.In individual events, there were wins for G.C. Foster College’s Ronda Whyte, AndrÈ Clarke, Nascieve Powell, and Sprintec’s Oshane Bailey.RECORD BOOKSWhyte and Clarke, who were members of Jamaica’s team to the World University Games last summer in Gwangju, Korea, wrote their names in the record books.Whyte won the women’s 400 metres hurdles in 58.24 seconds to erase former Edwin Allen High athlete Sherone Pinnock’s 2006 record of 59.30.Clarke, who fractured his right shoulder in practice a few days before the start of his event in Korea and could not participate, won the men’s 400m hurdles in 51.25, erasing the 2014 record of former St Elizabeth Technical High School (STETHS) standout Okeem Williams of 52.34.Bailey captured the men’s 100m in 10.32 seconds, finishing ahead of the G.C. Foster College duo of Colin King (10.33) and Chadic Thorpe (10.48). The other individual success for G.C. Foster College came in the men’s 400m Open as Powell won in 48.22 seconds.Sprintec won the women’s Open 4x400m relay, while G.C. Foster captured the men’s equivalent along with the men’s 4x200m and sprint medley.G.C. Foster College’s 4x400m quartet of Alvin Green, Demish Gayle, Marzell Miller, and Demar Murray won in a record of 3:07.17 to break MVP’s 2008 record of 3:08.01, with Sprintec second in a close 3:07.35 and UTech third in 3:09.71.It was a welcome return to the Milo Western Relays for Anneisha McLaughlin-Whilby, whose last appearance was with the MVP Track Club. Now representing Sprintec, she teamed up with Verone Chambers, Anastasia LeRoy, and Ristananna Tracey to win the women’s 4x400m in 3:32.47. UTech, with Janieve Russell and Shericka Jackson, were second in 3:33.18, with MVP, led by Stephenie McPherson, third in 3:36.22.G.C. Foster’s other successes came in the women’s sprint medley, which they won in 3:32.31 and the 4x200m Open in 1:23.42.MVP captured both 4x100m relays. In the women’s event, with World 100 metres champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and World 200 metres silver medallist Elaine Thompson, MVP clocked a record 43.31 to beat G.C. Foster College, 43.94.In a very close men’s event, MVP, with Julian Forte and Andrew Fisher, clocked 38.89 and just got the better of Sprintec, which clocked 38.90 seconds.last_img read more

first_imgIsaac Sunday Sieh, dubbed the funniest comedian now in Liberia, was the proud recipient of the keys to a sweet-smelling Nissan Altima, courtesy of Platinum Entertainment Production, in recognition for his hard work, dedication, and humility.Presenting the keys of vehicle to the famous Liberian Actor on Wednesday, Armed Forces Day, was the Chief Executive Officer of Platinum Entertainment Production, Mr. Dream DEBO, who attributed the gesture to the thespian’s dexterity and commitment to the development of Liberian Movies, promised to make sure that Paul’s colleagues are also next in line for such treats.Accepting the keys and beaming with smiles, Isaac Sunday Sieh expressed his utmost gratitude to Platinum Entertainment Production family, saying that it was “a heartwarming gesture and that anyone can achieve as much as he can but with hard work, dedication and humility.”Paul is one half of the comedic pair, John and Paul Flomo, of recent Liberian comic movies such as Dugbormar, Tom & Jerry, John In The Army, among others, which have helped to create a feeling of consolation and relaxation in the minds of Liberians, following the height of the Ebola outbreak.This comes as the first of its kind for a home based Liberian actor, since the boom of Liberian Movies.It can be recalled that Paul was recently seen on a promotional float for Cellcom GSM as he drew crowds in the Hundreds of thousands in and around Monrovia, strongly establishing and confirming himself as the most famous Liberian Comedian at the moment. Could he be a part of the circle of young Liberian artists and entertainers, among them Karie Walker, alias John Flomo, that are being signed on by the telecommunications giant? That could be anyone’s guess.With this initiative taken by a movie producing company, ensuring that its star is treated with the best respect and development possible, we can now look forward to corporate initiatives that could be a big boost to the well-being and talents of our best entertainers in the Liberian Entertainment Industry.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

first_img Yaroslavsky also introduced on Tuesday a motion directing county lawyers to draft an ordinance prohibiting county employees from negotiating future employment or the promise of income with those who have business before the county. The city of Los Angeles has a similar ordinance. “These laws serve to protect the integrity of government decision-making and to avoid impropriety, or the appearance of impropriety, when employees transfer between the public and private sectors,” Yaroslavsky said. The board is set to vote on both of the motions Nov. 1. Troy Anderson, (213) 974-8985 [email protected] 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week The auditor also recommended that the county develop a policy of using capital leases that reflect the acquisition and incurrence of obligations when entering into long-term, build-to-suit leases and ensure that the proper documents are obtained when leasing buildings. The Board of Supervisors approved an operating lease on the West Los Angeles welfare office in 2000, but auditors said they could not find any records to show why Sonnenblick-Del Rio was selected as the developer. The District Attorney’s Office is investigating Sonnenblick Del-Rio as part of a bid-rigging probe. Prosecutors served search warrants on the county’s Chief Administrative Office’s Real Estate Division and its head, Chuck West, 55, of South Pasadena, for any vacation photos of West and his wife and any recordings demonstrating any conspiracy between West and the developers, according to the warrants. West, who was placed on paid leave Sept. 14, has denied he provided inside information to Sonnenblick-Del Rio or allowed officials to pay for his vacations to Jamaica, Europe and Breckenridge, Colo. Sonnenblick-Del Rio officials did not return calls for comment. After an audit found that Los Angeles County owed the federal government millions of dollars for improper lease-back deals on four welfare offices, two supervisors on Tuesday asked whether the money could be recouped from the deals’ developers. “There is a lot of money involved here,” Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky said in making the motion with Michael D. Antonovich. The motion also would require the county to follow the auditor’s recommendations to review hundreds of other leases to ensure that state and federal guidelines are followed. The audit released last week found that the county must reimburse the federal government $6 million for a portion of the past lease payments on two buildings in El Monte and others in Glendale and West Los Angeles and reduce future claims by $1.4 million annually. last_img read more

The Playoff Implications Of Every Game For Every NFL Team

“Playoff Implications” is a phrase you usually don’t hear until the final weeks of the NFL regular season, but almost every regular season game has playoff implications. In the early going, however, it can be difficult to figure out just what those implications are, and how much is riding on each game.Most other major sports leagues play a greater number of regular season games, and thus the playoff picture in those sports evolves in a more incremental fashion. The pace can seem glacial at times for MLB, and inevitable and foregone when it comes to the NBA. But with just 16 regular season games, the NFL’s playoff landscape can change dramatically over the course of a single Sunday afternoon. And these tectonic shifts take place throughout the season, not just in those final weeks of December.With a week or two left in the season, the “eye test” usually suffices for judging which games will shape the playoff picture. But in mid-October there are far too many possibilities for the unassisted human mind to make sense of. We can only speak in general terms. For example, we know the playoff chances for the New Orleans Saints will improve with a victory this Sunday over the Detroit Lions. But by how much? And how far would they drop with a loss? Expanding our focus, what other teams have a vested interest in the outcome of this game? One would expect Carolina’s playoff chances to improve with a Saints loss, given that the Saints are their division rival. But once again, by how much?To answer these questions, we’ve created a weekly feature that measures the playoff implications of each game. To do this, you need to be able to simulate the remainder of the season multiple times and analyze the results. And in order to simulate the season, you need a way to rank all 32 teams, and use that ranking to create outcome probabilities for future games. We’ve been doing just that with FiveThirtyEight’s Elo rankings. But the Elo ratings, simple and beautiful, aren’t the only word on NFL rankings. For this feature we’re going to turn to the wisdom of the crowd instead, and use a ranking system one of the authors developed based on betting markets. In stock market terms, think of it as technical analysis in lieu of fundamental analysis.We’ll get into the methodology in a moment but first the results. Think of each interactive table below as a playoff implications “cheat sheet” for this week’s upcoming games.1The table is initially sorted by game importance, where we define importance by its cumulative impact on the playoff picture. Where you see blank cells on the table corresponds to games and teams in which there was not a statistically significant difference in playoff odds. (If you hover over a colored square, you’ll see details for that game.)UPDATE (Oct. 17, 12:30 p.m.): The interactive tables above have been updated to include Thursday night’s game, which now shows no playoff implications because its result is included in the playoff chances (the text of the article has not been updated).Reading the table across tells you which teams are affected by any particular game.2Notice that we don’t restrict ourselves to just the two teams competing in each game. As we alluded to above, teams benefit when they win games, but they also benefit when division rivals (and other competitors for playoff seeding) lose games. The Panthers, for example, would see their playoff chances rise by 11 percent with a Saints loss to the Lions. Reading the table down tells you which games matter most to any given team. For example, if you’re a Texans fan, what games should you care about this week, how much should you care about them, and who do you want to win? The column headers are sortable, so clicking on the “HOU” column tells you to care about HOU @ PIT, ATL @ BAL, CIN @ IND, NYJ @ NE, CLE @ JAC, and KC @ SD — in that order. And you want the Texans, Falcons, Bengals, Jets, Jaguars and Chiefs to win.My rankings start from the assumption that the NFL gambling market is efficient, and then attempts to determine how that efficient market ranks each of the 32 NFL teams. Unfortunately, Vegas doesn’t actually share its rankings with the general public, but with a little reverse-engineering, we can arrive at a pretty good guess at what they are. We start with the point spread. For Thursday night’s game, the New England Patriots are a 9.5-point favorite at home against the New York Jets. Since home field advantage is worth about 2.5 points, the market thinks the Patriots are 7 points better than the Jets when playing on a neutral field.Armed with this interpretation, we then take the point spreads from each game and for multiple weeks and run a simple linear regression to arrive at a consensus ranking. The process is akin to drawing a map of the United States but nobody tells you a city’s location. Instead, they only tell you how far away each city is from another city (e.g. Los Angeles is 1,700 miles away from Chicago, Chicago is 165 miles from Indianapolis, and so on). To further complicate matters, our map “moves” over time, making earlier “distance” measurements less reliable. For example, the Steelers opened the season as a 6-point favorite at home against the Browns. If the market were to set that point spread today, Pittsburgh would most likely drop to just a 2.5-point favorite, as the Steelers have fallen short of preseason expectations, and the Browns have exceeded them. So, the ranking methodology gives more weight to recent point spread data in an attempt to get the most up-to-date market evaluation of each team.Now that we have a ranking system that assigns a probability to each future regular season game outcome, the next step is to simulate the season multiple times (50,000 times to be exact). After simulating win/loss records, we apply the NFL playoff seeding rules (plus tiebreakers) and summarize the results. There are already several sites that do these types of simulations for the purpose of producing team playoff odds (including FiveThirtyEight). For this feature, we’re going to go a bit deeper than that.Instead of focusing on each team’s overall playoff odds, let’s instead focus on each game. We’ll use the New Orleans-Detroit game as an example. Of the 50,000 simulation runs, there were precisely 30,180 (or about 60 percent) that resulted in a Lions victory, and 19,820 that resulted in a Saints victory. Let’s now focus on those two samples in isolation. Of the 30,180 simulations in which the Saints lost, they made the playoffs 8,273 times, or 27 percent. Of the 19,820 simulations in which the Saints won, they made the playoffs 9,172 times, or 46 percent. Put simply, the Saints playoff odds could swing by a not-insignificant 19 percent as a result of their game against the Lions. (The games with the most cumulative influence on the overall playoff picture (“leverage”) are listed at left).We can repeat this calculation for every game and every team. The result: A measure of how much every game matters to every team. read more

cwick (Chadwick Matlin, senior editor): The NFL finally has its own version of the Starr Report. After a months-long investigation and hundreds of pages, a law firm hired by the NFL has found that the Patriots most likely did tamper with their footballs, and that Tom Brady was likely “generally aware of the inappropriate activities.” The report itself is sensational, full of amazing details about the bathroom habits of low-level assistants, furtive trash talk about Tom Brady, and a statistical appendix that seems designed for FiveThirtyEight to dissect. Let’s all assemble and talk about it! What stuck out most?andrewflowers (Andrew Flowers, quantitative editor): The report — especially the stat-sy appendix — went to great lengths to show that the difference in pressure between the Pats’ and Colts’ footballs was not due to chance.benm (Benjamin Morris, sportswriter): I would say that the report hammers home the stats and science sides of this extremely well so as to head off any skepticism on those fronts, but they’re relatively easy cases to make. You don’t need a stats degree to look at that table and see that something is amiss.The salacious parts to me are the surrounding facts: Who was responsible, how long has this been going on, what did Tom Brady know and when did he know it, etc? It has a lot more to say on those subjects than I would have guessed.neil_paine (Neil Paine, senior sportswriter): Yeah @benm – I was surprised they had the texts, which referred specifically to Brady being on the guy’s case about ball pressure.benm: And they present pretty good evidence that this was a deliberate rules violation for the purposes of gaining an advantage for Tom Brady and the Patriots organization, AND has likely been going on for some time.benc (Ben Casselman, chief economics writer): I am an unapologetic Pats fan, and would name my firstborn Brady if my wife would allow it. But one question I had was how clear it is that Brady wanted the balls UNDER 12.5 psi vs. as close to the minimum as possible. He seems to have complained about the balls in the Jets game, but those seem to have been inflated well over 12.5.neil_paine: @benc – Right, they did complain the balls were at 16 one game.benm: Agreed the evidence about Brady (at least from 30 minutes of dissecting it) seems a little more thin than evidence against McNally and Jastremski. [Jim McNally is the Officials Locker Room attendant for the Patriots, and John Jastremski is an equipment assistant for the team.]neil_paine: Another interesting note is that it was the first time in 19 years Walt Anderson [the head NFL referee for the game] couldn’t account for the balls. In the other games this was happening, who was the referee and what did he notice?benc: That feels to me a bit like the kind of thing you notice only after the fact though. Like, how sure are we Anderson would have noticed if he couldn’t find the balls on other occasions where no one raised questions?cwick: Left unaddressed is whether deflated balls had been helping the Patriots win — do we have any better sense for that now than we did before? Because before we thought this was isolated to just the Colts game, which they won handily. But now it seems like this was about Tom Brady’s preferences in more than just that game.benm: I think the much-maligned study by Warren Sharp about the Patriots having a low fumble rate should be taken more seriously, for sure. I mean, though it had flaws, at a very minimum that author correctly identified that the Patriots fumble rate has been absurdly small. I did my own calculations using binomial and Poisson models and found the same.benc: NOW this is a 538 chat!benm: But the fun part is when you get all Bayesian about it. As I said at the time, the existence of the Patriots’ extremely low fumble rate, as a Bayesian matter, makes it much more likely that the Patriots were intentionally cheating – even though the link between fumble rates and inflation levels is only speculative. That’s the beauty of Bayesianism. But it gets better: Now that it seems likely that the Patriots were violating the rules to gain an advantage, the fact that they also had an extremely low fumble rate makes it more likely that the relationship between inflation levels and fumbling is real – and more likely that the Patriots have materially benefited from their cheating.cwick: @benm “That’s the beauty of…” is a phrase that’s been written so many times. That may be the first time the sentence ended with “Bayesianism.”neil_paine: Agreed that some of those outlier Patriots stats deserve a second look – although it bears noting that the report specifically exonerates [head coach Bill] Belichick, so this doesn’t appear to be part of a grander conspiracy involving the entire team. (Certainly the team beyond Brady could benefit, though.)One question regarding the fumbling is whether non-QB players coming to the Patriots from other teams noticed a change in ball feel.benm: Agreed, the report seems to be focused primarily on these two Pats personnel, with a looser link to Brady.neil_paine: If I recall correctly, the WOWY (with or without you) evidence with players going to/from New England wasn’t very convincing after removing special teams plays.benm: But what do you do in a situation where the team benefits from one person in the organization bending rules? USC has lost national championships for less.neil_paine: Right, was going to say, that’s the kind of moral question that often haunts college teams forced to vacate wins/titles. (And unrelated players are faced with future bowl bans.)benm: And again, just to be clear. I’m not saying the Pats did gain some huge advantage from this. But the odds of that have gone up substantially.cwick: ok — can we talk about the data appendix for a minute, because I was floored by the detail.benm: Indeed, the science-y stuff “floored” me more than the stats.cwick: To your eyes, is this the most high-profile statistical model of the year? and were you impressed by it?andrewflowers: What I love about this report is the various extents the researchers went to make their analysis iron-clad: the natural experiment of comparing the Colts (control group) and Pats’ footballs; the statistical inference (p-values!) in examining the differences in the pressure changes; and the hard-science engineering to test the environmental effects. I mean, just look at this photo…andrewflowers: Someone also apparently “simulated” whether it’s possible to deflate 13 footballs in under 1 minute and 40 seconds. Apparently it is.benm: Honestly, it’s probably overkill. But that is, in a sense, a product of the incredibly strong statistical case. So I kind of give them credit for going so far to address alternate possibilities. A model a lot of stats people could probably learn from. I mean, once it’s clear that this didn’t happen by chance, the discussion moves to: So what explains it.benc: What do we think the odds are these guys were getting paid by the hour?andrewflowers: Very high.benm: Law firm: Yes — paid by the hour.benc: Because this has a definite, “Hey, is there another test we could run?” element to this.benm: And you think FiveThirtyEight is nerdy.andrewflowers: Honestly, today’s report is the best thing for the “Ideal Gas Law” since Bill Nye the Science Guy aired.cwick: Final question: What stat analysis does this report make you want to run out and do?andrewflowers: @benm’s point about the relationship between fumble rates and ball pressure.benc: Chart of “humor of references to Tom Brady’s balls” over time.benm: There’s definitely more to be done on the Patriots fumbling to isolate for the fact that they were the most consistently winning team, the types of plays they ran, their personnel, how that period fits in historical context (have other dominant teams had similarly bizarre quirks), etc.neil_paine: And perhaps another look at Brady from 2007 onward in general. That season was very much out of step with his previous performance. And what followed was very different as well. Do other QBs suddenly get that much better, at that age?benm: WOWD: With or Without Deflation.neil_paine: Lolbenm: Even if org isn’t culpable, it’s a pretty massive shift in the conversation about Pats. Suddenly we’re faced with the possibility of having to discount some amazing sports accomplishment. Again.neil_paine: “Behind every great fortune is a great crime.” This afternoon the NFL released the results of an investigation into whether or not the New England Patriots intentionally deflated footballs below league standards. The report was so sensational that we had to gather some of our best sports minds to talk about it. Here’s an edited transcript of our Slack conversation. read more

San Diego Blood Bank taking donations in honor of El Paso and

first_img KUSI Newsroom, San Diego Blood Bank taking donations in honor of El Paso and Dayton shootings August 5, 2019 Categories: Local San Diego News, Trending FacebookTwitter KUSI Newsroom Posted: August 5, 2019 SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – The San Diego Blood Bank announced Monday that it is accepting blood donations in honor of those injured during the deadly weekend shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio.Blood bank officials said they received multiple calls from residents asking how to donate blood locally for victims of the shootings.“Our thoughts and prayers are with all the victims and their families,” said blood bank CEO David Wellis. “We stand ready to send blood to the affected areas if needed.”On Saturday morning, a gunman opened fire in a crowded Walmart store in El Paso, leaving 20 people dead and injuring more than dozen others. Two more victims have since died of their injuries, bringing the death toll to 22, authorities announced Monday morning.News footage showed people in El Paso lining up in the hot sun over the weekend to donate blood.Early Sunday morning, an assailant wearing a mask, body armor and hearing protection opened fire at a bar in a popular entertainment district in Dayton, leaving nine people dead and at least 27 wounded.Eligible blood donors must be age 17 or older, at least 114 pounds and in good general health, according to the San Diego Blood Bank, which will take walk-in donors but encourages prospective donors to make an appointment at sandiegobloodbank.org/donate or by calling 800-469-7322. last_img read more